“Where higher beings commanded, …“ - Heinrich Nüsslein & Friends

7 March–13 April 2019
“Where higher beings commanded, …“ - Heinrich Nüsslein & Friends, 2019
Exhibition view
Galerie Guido W. Baudach

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

Heinrich Nüsslein

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

1938/39
Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

Group of works „Anna Staudinger“
Various media on paper, 15 parts
Approx. 53 x 43 cm each, framed
Detail

Der Junge und das Mädchen, 2018
Thomas Helbig

Oil, crayon and toner on paper
57 x 42 cm, framed

Anthropomorphic Landscape I, 2005
Gotscha Gozalishvili

Oil on canvas, artist's frame
46 x 61 cm

Dark Times, 2014
Andy Hope 1930

Acrylic on canvas board
64 x 64 cm, framed

Ohne Titel (Kreuze I), 2009
Erwin Kneihsl

Gelatin silver print, collage, artist's frame
46 x 64 cm

A.F.: Magic Square Face #A1, 2019

Acrylic, oil, varnish on canvas
61 x 51 cm

Messina, 2008
Markus Selg

Piezo print on paper
42,5 x 55 cm, framed

Galerie Guido W. Baudach is pleased to present “Where higher beings commanded, ...” a rare series of works from the mediumistic painter Heinrich Nüsslein (1879–1947). The group of expressive and fantastical landscapes and portraits from the widely overlooked outsider artist originally stem from a private Berlin collection. The paintings are accompanied in the exhibition by works from select contemporary artists whose practices and common preference for certain classical subjects and unconventional design forms evince a particular closeness to Heinrich Nüsslein, above all their tendency towards intuitive placement amongst them Gotscha Gozalishvili, Thomas Helbig, Andy Hope 1930, Erwin Kneihsl, Markus Selg and Thomas Zipp.

Yet while Nüsslein espoused occult superstitions and was convinced that his paintings conveyed extrasensory inspirations from the spirit world, the contemporary artists accompanying him in the exhibition display no esoteric eccentricities whatsoever. Rather, they practice a rational, calculated openness to the unprovoked or unintentional and the coincidences that arise within the creation process. They utilize this openness in their art in a manner both self-evident and free from pathos, quite similar to what the Surrealists and other modern and postmodern artists already explicitly practiced, especially with art brut. They do so, however, without the irony and self-satisfaction often found in this context, but with genuine professional interest and sincere collegial respect for the work of so-called outsider artists such as Heinrich Nüsslein.

Nüsslein, born in Nuremberg as the son of an artisan, began his mediumistic art practice in the mid-1920s. At this time he was already 55 years old and had led the solidly middle-class life of a rather prosperous antiques dealer and contented father. He had always nurtured an interest in the fine arts, in painting in particular, and in his younger years had had serious ambitions for an artistic career. However, due to economic pressures and – most of all – the severely impaired eyesight that made conventional painting impossible all his life, Nüsslein already had several failed attempts to complete classical art training behind him. After coming into contact with spiritualist circles via a customer who had purchased some antique paintings from him, Nüsslein was inspired to resume his artistic practice. His resulting introduction to mediumistic painting may well have struck him as an unexpected opportunity or fateful coincidence to still find success as an artist, even if it was outside the traditional canon.

At that time, the still-nascent modern age had already turned the traditional understanding of art on its head. Apart from the now-ubiquitous abstraction and the residual reverberations of the spirit photography that had been extremely popular at the end of the 19th century, there were two of-the-moment currents within art and art theory that were particularly instrumental to mediumistic painting and its reception during the early 1920s. One was the recent elevation of another form of outsider art, the “Artistry of the Mentally Ill”, to the echelons of the art world, thanks to psychiatrist and art historian Hans Prinzhorn. The other – also directly influenced by Prinzhorn – was the spread of the tenets of Surrealism, which proclaimed “psychic automatism [....] in the absence of any control exercised by reason” as its highest principle.

Heinrich Nüsslein adhered to this principle in a certain sense when he began creating paintings and texts in 1924 that did not originate from his consciousness. But while the Surrealists strove to draw inspiration from their own unconscious, Nüsslein sought inspiration from outside himself: from the realm of the supernatural. He explained how he had to deliberately and systematically practice excluding his ego to facilitate the automatic texts and images that he created, a practice similar to meditation. His focus lay unequivocally on painting, to which text was subordinated as corresponding commentary or explanation. And Nüsslein, insofar as he is representative of modernism, developed his very own technique through his experimental use of the material: a style of glaze painting that he described as “color etching.” With this technique, he would apply highly diluted paint, for the most part oil paint, to a sheet of glossy paper or cardboard and then work out his motifs at a rapid pace using small balls of fabric, tufts of cotton or his own fingertips, which he would at times coat partially in gold dust. This process, rooted in his self-study of the material and technical fundamentals of painting, served to enhance the durability of his works. He also preferred to perform it in semi-darkness, without looking at what he was doing and holding casual conversation with the people present all throughout.

The disadvantages caused by his weak eyesight, which had excluded him from a classical career as a painter, he thus turned into a virtue with his mediumistic practice. Various eyewitness testimonies attest to the major impression Nüsslein's painting performance left on those privy to it. In particular, the speed with which he produced his paintings inspired incredulous astonishment. Nüsslein himself considered his speed to be directly related to the quality of his works – that is, the less time needed to create, the more successful the painting. Ideally, each piece would be finished in only one take. Accordingly, Nüsslein subjected his works to critical examination only upon completion of the painting process and even then rarely made adjustments or additions.

The resulting paintings, solely landscapes and portraits, are often virtuosic in their execution, in terms of color, light, perspective and composition. At the same time, they exhibit strong stereotypes and repetitive moments, both in the landscapes and, to an even greater extent, in the portraits, with their consistently austere, sometimes sinister facial expressions. Both the landscapes and portraits always depict the past, whether deceased people or the places they once occupied. Realistic resemblance or lifelike reproduction were irrelevant. All that mattered was the intensity of expression. A major portion of Nüsslein's paintings fall into his self-described category of “contact paintings.” By this he meant paintings whose composition and content were “entered” into him via contact with a person, a piece of music or literature.

Nüsslein believed in reincarnation, karma and supernatural powers despite evidently having never belonged to any particular esoteric or parapsychological group. In a number of writings, he explored the genealogy of his mediumistic art. With a relative absence of reflection, he described these works as “metaphysical” or “psychic painting,” and himself as an “intuitive image writer.” The fundamental characteristic of his works, however, always remained the fantastical elements of the underlying visual world.

When it comes to the categories of outsider on the one hand and professional artist on the other, Heinrich Nüsslein and his work resist classification in both, then as well as now. For the art brut purists, both his works and their creator himself were and still are too strongly influenced by artistic training. For representatives of academically influenced art, on the other hand, Nüsslein is quite simply too obscure, if he is even noticed at all.

Nüsslein worked for a particular audience, however, which consisted primarily of spiritualists and other esotericists with an affinity for art. Amongst such circles, he even enjoyed a small amount of celebrity at the beginning of the 1930s, with exhibitions and other honors broad, from Brussels and Paris to London and New York, that garnered appreciation for his unusual creation process. Amongst parapsychologists in Germany, there was already talk of the “H. Nüsslein phenomenon.” Like many other followers of the occult, Nüsslein was initially very positive about the National Socialists’ rise to power. Soon, however, he found that his works were classified as “un-German” and “degenerate” by the Third Reich. After being banned from exhibiting, he withdrew to a small village in Chiemgau in the mid-1930s, where the state mechanisms of persecution and control, unlike in his hometown of Nuremberg, apparently left him by and large alone.

Of the thousands of works that Nüsslein created in the course of his mediumistic art practice, a sizeable number of which he was able to make at least temporarily accessible to the public in his spacious home, only comparatively few have survived. The rest were either confiscated by the Nazi dictatorship or destroyed during the Second World War. Of these surviving works, most were commissioned pieces held within private collections.

Amongst these are the works to be seen in the new exhibition. They are landscapes and portraits that surfaced some time ago in a Berlin flea market, once belonging to a certain Anna Staudinger from Berlin-Adlershof. Also on display are the accompanying descriptions of the paintings, pieces of automatic writing described by Nüsslein as “legends,” typewritten on the pre-printed stationery of the self-proclaimed “painter and writer of the supernatural.” Nüsslein very likely did not create most of the pictures and texts in the actual presence of “contact person” Anna Staudinger, but rather on the basis of writing samples and photos of her. However, it seems that two times at least they met in person and each time Nüsslein created a painting and a related text for her, first in September 1938 and then again in November 1939, both times in Berlin.
Enclosed with the finished works was an autograph card, also included in the exhibition, featuring a black-and-white photograph of a picturesque portrait of Nüsslein, undoubtedly commissioned from an academically trained colleague. The portrait was kept entirely in the style of the New Objectivity movement, except with a ghostly hand, very out of place in this context, at the top right of the picture, hovering over the painter's shoulder as if emerging from the darkness.

In total, Nüsslein created seven landscapes and seven portraits for his Berlin client. He began with a single portrait at their first encounter in September 1938, carving the word “blessing” into the paint on the lower right and explaining in the accompanying legend that the depicted likeness was an “image of peace” that would bring both joy and protection to its addressee. Whether the painting depicted Anna Staudinger herself in a previous life or another person entirely is unclear from the text. What is known, however, is that Anna Staudinger was so impressed that just one year later, she commissioned a whole series of paintings, a so-called Karmaschau (karma-show) that she would exhibit near their corresponding sites of action: six portraits and six associated landscapes in six earlier incarnations. Explanations were again provided by corresponding captions in the usual pathetic and cryptic jargon.

Unfortunately, only nine of the twelve commissioned paintings have survived, five portraits and four landscapes. These are hung in the exhibition with empty spaces in between that make apparent the gaps in the series. The original descriptions of the paintings, also on exhibit, explain in precise succession from 1 to 12 what we see in the paintings – or what we do not see, in the cases of the missing paintings: an earlier incarnation of Anna Staudinger as priestess of a sun cult in ancient Mexico, for example, as a sports teacher in the “Empire of the Lemurs,” as a peacemaker during the era of the Cherusci, as a master builder of the male sex in the fifth millennium B.C. or as a temple servant on Mars. By matching paintings with descriptions, it’s possible to identify precisely which of the Nüsslein set of works are missing from the Anna Staudinger collection.

As Heinrich Nüsslein himself explained in one of his writings, he frequently created such twelve-part karma-shows in the 1930s, the sequencing of which provided “quite extraordinary clarification” about the past lives and reincarnations of an individual. Until now, however, it was not known whether any series of this kind had been preserved. The karma-show by Anna Staudinger thus seems to be an absolute rarity, despite its fragmentary state. It may well be the only almost-complete Karmaschau by Heinrich Nüsslein to have survived.

Another landscape, painted only a few weeks later in November 1939 – during another Berlin stay and possibly an addition to the first portrait Nüsslein painted for Anna Staudinger – has also been lost. Only the legend still exists, describing a “temple from the Maya cult in the holy gardens” and which is exhibited here on its own, without any painterly visualization.

All of the Nüsslein paintings once owned by Anna Staudinger display references to his artistic role models, from the symbolism and expressionism of his portraits to the East Asian silk and finger painting and Art Nouveau of the landscapes. But as much as Nüsslein was inspired by artworks and styles known to him, he was also just as concerned with his own innovative approach, which is evident in both his self-referential use of the material and in his application of unconventional techniques. Heinrich Nüsslein practiced a ritualized painting process, characterized by the repetition of stylistic devices and motifs while at the same time remaining gestural. Fully in the manner of modern abstraction, color represents a quality in itself. In this respect, Heinrich Nüsslein, although included in some collections specializing in outsider art and emphatically taken up by later artists such as Arnulf Rainer, is not only an outstanding protagonist of mediumistic art, but also a remarkable painter of modernism who has been unjustly forgotten to a large extent.

The accompanying works in the exhibition provide a consistent and representative extract from the oeuvres of a variety of contemporary artists. The majority of these works were not produced especially for the exhibition. As small in format as the Nüsslein paintings, the pieces range from paintings and photographs to drawings and collages.

 

One of these artists is the Berlin-based Georgian painter Gotscha Gozalishvili, whose many-colored inpainting from 2005 has the format of a landscape and yet bears a remote resemblance to a portrait. A current paper work from Thomas Helbig combines frottage and drawing techniques as well as figural and abstract moments in a likeness of a multifaceted, manifold personality. In contrast, the 2013 painting Dark Times by Andy Hope 1930 is a portrait with collage elements that could have come from a dystopian, surreal sci-fi comic. The 2009 photo collage by Erwin Kneihsl Ohne Titel (Kreuze I) is a dramatic staging of a famous Lithuanian pilgrimage site, depicted as an apocalyptic landscape in grainy black-and-white contrasts. Markus Selg in his computer-created painting Messina from the year 2010 has conceived a terrain that is no less fantastical than the nature sceneries of Heinrich Nüsslein. Meanwhile, Thomas Zipp’s 2019 portrait painting A.F.: Magic Square Face evokes an impression of the complete dissolution of the individual human face in favor of a (pseudo-)scientific principle.

Die Galerie Guido W. Baudach freut sich, unter dem Titel „Wo höhere Wesen befahlen, ...“ eine seltene Bilderserie des medialen Malers Heinrich Nüsslein (1879 – 1947) zu präsentieren. Der ursprünglich aus einer Berliner Sammlung stammenden Gruppe von expressiv-fantastischen Landschafts- und Porträtgemälden des wenig rezipierten Außenseiters werden Arbeiten einiger ausgewählter zeitgenössischer Künstler zur Seite gestellt, deren jeweilige Praxis, neben der gemeinsamen Vorliebe für bestimmte klassische Sujets und unkonventionellen Gestaltungsformen, vor allem durch die Neigung zur intuitiven Setzung eine gewisse Nähe zu Heinrich Nüsslein aufweist, darunter Gotscha Gozalishvili, Thomas Helbig, Andy Hope 1930, Erwin Kneihsl, Markus Selg und Thomas Zipp.

Doch während Nüsslein in okkultem Aberglauben der Überzeugung anhing, in seinen Bildern übersinnliche Eingebungen aus der Geisterwelt auszuführen, trifft man bei den genannten Künstlern der Gegenwart auf keinerlei esoterische Verstiegenheit. Vielmehr praktizieren sie eine rational-kalkulierte Offenheit gegenüber Momenten des Grund- bzw. Absichtslosen und Zufälligen innerhalb des eigenen Schaffensprozesses; eine Offenheit, welche sie ebenso selbstverständlich wie pathosfrei für ihre Kunst nutzbar machen; ganz ähnlich, wie dies bereits die Surrealisten und andere Künstler der Moderne und Postmoderne mit ausdrücklichem Bezug, insbesondere auf die Art brut, praktiziert haben; allerdings ohne die dabei häufig anzutreffende Ironie und Selbstgefälligkeit, sondern mit echtem professionellen Interesse und aufrichtigem kollegialem Respekt für die Kunst von sogenannten Außenseiterkünstlern wie Heinrich Nüsslein.

Nüsslein, der in Nürnberg als Sohn eines Kunsthandwerkers geboren wurde, begann sein mediumistisches Kunstschaffen Mitte der Zwanziger Jahre. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war er bereits fünfundfünfzig Jahre alt und führte das bürgerliche Leben eines recht wohlhabend gewordenen Antiquitätenhändlers und glücklichen Familienvaters. Für bildende Kunst hatte er sich schon immer interessiert, insbesondere für Malerei, und zumindest in jungen Jahren hatte er auch durchaus ernsthafte Ambitionen auf eine entsprechende Karriere gehegt. Doch wirtschaftliche Zwänge sowie vor allem eine stark eingeschränkte Sehkraft, die ein Arbeiten nach der Natur zeitlebens unmöglich machte, hatten den Versuch, eine klassische Ausbildung als Kunstmaler abzuschließen, gleich mehrfach scheitern lassen. Die Inspiration zur Wiederaufnahme der künstlerischen Arbeit verdankte Nüsslein spiritistischen Kreisen, mit denen er eher zufällig über einen Geschäftskunden, der bei ihm alte Gemälde kaufte, in Kontakt kam. Die Begegnung mit der medialen Malerei dürfte ihm als unerwartete Chance bzw. schicksalhafte Fügung erschienen sein, doch noch als Künstler zu reüssieren, wenn auch etwas abseits des traditionellen Kanons.

Die althergebrachte Kunstauffassung hatte die noch junge Moderne allerdings bereits gründlich auf den Kopf gestellt. Abgesehen von der inzwischen schon allgegenwärtigen Abstraktion und dem Nachhall der Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts äußerst populären Geisterfotografie waren es vor allem zwei aktuelle Strömungen innerhalb der Kunst und Kunsttheorie, die der medialen Malerei und ihrer Rezeption im Laufe der frühen Zwanziger Jahre besonders förderlich wurden; zum einen die jüngst erfolgte Erhebung einer anderen Außenseiterkunst, der „Bildnerei der Geisteskranken“ in den Kunstrang durch den Psychiater und Kunsthistoriker Hans Prinzhorn, zum anderen - unmittelbar durch Prinzhorn beeinflusst – die Ausbreitung der surrealistischen Kunstauffassung, die den „psychischen Automatismus (...) ohne jede Vernunft-Kontrolle“ zu ihrem obersten Prinzip erklärte.

Dieser Vorgabe folgte in gewissem Sinne auch Heinrich Nüsslein, als er 1924 damit anfing, Bilder und Texte anzufertigen, die ihren Ursprung nicht in seinem Bewusstsein haben sollten. Doch während die Surrealisten aus dem eigenen Unbewussten zu schöpfen versuchten, suchte Nüsslein den Quell der Inspiration außerhalb seiner selbst, bei übersinnlichen Wesen. Er selbst erklärte, dass er die Ausschaltung des eigenen Egos zum Zwecke der automatischen Verfertigung von Texten und Bildern ganz gezielt habe einüben müssen; ähnlich wie dies beim Meditieren der Fall ist. Der Schwerpunkt lag dabei eindeutig bei der Malerei, der die Texte im Sinne von zugehörigen Kommentaren bzw. Erläuterungen nachgeordnet waren. Und Nüsslein, insofern ganz Vertreter der Moderne, entwickelte durch seinen experimentellen Umgang mit dem Material eine ganz eigene Technik, eine Lasurmalerei, die er selbst als „Farbradierung“ bezeichnete. Dabei trug er stark verdünnte Farbe, zumeist Öl, auf einen Bogen Lackpapier oder Pappe auf und arbeitete dann mit kleinen Stoffknäueln, Wattebäuschen oder auch den eigenen Fingerspitzen in raschem Tempo seine Motive aus, welche er bisweilen sogar noch partiell mit Goldstaub belegte; all dies einerseits auf der Basis eines selbstangeeigneten malkundlichen Fachwissens im Dienste der Haltbarkeit seiner Werke, andererseits vorzugsweise im Halbdunkel durchgeführt, ohne Hinzuschauen und im lockeren Gespräch mit anwesenden Personen. Aus der Not seines nur schwachen Augenlichts, die eine klassische Malerkarriere verhindert hatte, machte er somit als medialer Maler eine Tugend. Verschiedene Berichte von Augenzeugen belegen, welch großen Eindruck Nüssleins Malperformance auf Zuschauer machte. Insbesondere die Schnelligkeit, mit der er seine Bilder anfertigte, gab immer wieder Anlass für ungläubiges Staunen beim Publikum. Nüsslein selbst stellte die Geschwindigkeit des Malprozesses in direkten Zusammenhang zur Qualität seiner Bilder, d.h. desto weniger Zeit er beim Malen benötigte, um so besser musste das jeweilige Bild gelungen sein. Idealerweise sollte es auch in nur einem Zug gemalt sein. Dementsprechend unterzog Nüsslein seine Werke auch erst nach Beendigung des Malprozesses einer bewertenden Betrachtung und nahm dann eher selten noch Retuschen oder Ergänzungen vor.

Die so entstandenen Bilder, ausschließlich Landschaften und Porträts, sind, was Farbgebung, Licht, Perspektive und Komposition betrifft, oftmals geradezu virtuos ausgeführt. Gleichzeitig weisen sie stark stereotype und repetitive Momente auf, was sowohl die Landschaften als auch in noch stärkerer Form die Personenbildnisse mit ihren durchgängig strengen, teils finsteren Gesichtsausdrücken betrifft. Beide Bildtypen, Landschaft wie Porträt, stellen stets Vergangenes dar, seien es verstorbene Personen oder deren einstige Aufenthaltsorte. Reale Ähnlichkeit oder naturgetreue Wiedergabe waren dabei keine relevanten Parameter. Ausschlaggebend war allein die Intensität des Ausdrucks.

Ein großer Teil von Nüssleins Bildern zählt zu der von ihm selbst so bezeichneten Kategorie der „Kontaktbilder“. Darunter verstand er Gemälde, deren Aufbau und Inhalt ihm durch den Kontakt mit einer Person, einem Stück Musik oder Literatur „eingegeben“ wurde. Nüsslein glaubte an Reinkarnation, Karma und übersinnliche Kräfte, ohne offenbar je einer bestimmten esoterischen oder parapsychologischen Gruppierung angehört zu haben. Er verfasste mehrere Schriften, in denen er sich zur Genealogie seiner medialen Kunst äußerte. Relativ unreflektiert bezeichnete er diese mal als „metaphysische“ mal als „psychische Malerei“, und sich selbst als „intuitiven Bilderschreiber“. Das wesentliche Merkmal seiner Werke blieb jedoch stets das Fantastische der zugrundeliegenden Bildwelt.

Was die Einordnung in die Kategorien Außenseiter einerseits, professioneller Künstler andererseits betrifft, saß und sitzt Heinrich Nüsslein mit seinem Werk buchstäblich zwischen allen Stühlen. Den Puristen der Art brut waren und sind die Arbeiten sowie auch ihr Schöpfer zu stark künstlerisch vorgeschult, um Anerkennung zu finden. Den Vertretern der akademisch geprägten Kunst dagegen war und ist beides, sofern Nüsslein ihrerseits überhaupt je Beachtung fand, meist schlichtweg obskur.

Nüsslein arbeitete allerdings auch für ein spezielles Publikum, welches in der Hauptsache aus Spiritisten und anderen Esoterikern mit Affinität zur Kunst bestand. In den entsprechenden Kreisen war er zu Anfang der 1930er Jahre sogar eine kleine Berühmtheit, die nicht zuletzt im Ausland von Brüssel und Paris über London bis nach New York mit Ausstellungen und anderen Ehrungen derart für ihr außergewöhnliches Schaffen gewürdigt wurde, dass unter Parapsychologen in Deutschland bereits vom „Phänomen H. Nüsslein“ die Rede war. Der Machtübernahme der Nationalsozialisten stand Nüsslein wie viele andere Anhänger des Okkulten zunächst sehr positiv gegenüber. Schon bald musste er jedoch feststellen, dass seine Arbeiten im Dritten Reich als „undeutsch“ und „entartet“ eingestuft und mit Ausstellungsverbot belegt wurden, woraufhin er sich Mitte der Dreißiger Jahre in ein kleines Dorf im Chiemgau zurückzog, wo ihn der staatliche Verfolgungs- und Kontrollapparat, anders als im heimischen Nürnberg, offenbar weitestgehend in Ruhe ließ.

Von mehreren tausend Bildern, die Nüsslein im Laufe seines medialen Schaffens erstellt hat, und von denen er zumindest zeitweilig einen ansehnlichen Teil in seinem weitläufigen Privathaus der Öffentlichkeit zugänglich machen konnte, sind jedoch nicht zuletzt in Folge der Beschlagnahmung durch die NS-Diktatur und die Zerstörungen des Zweiten Weltkriegs nur vergleichsweise wenige erhalten geblieben, in der Hauptsache ehemalige Auftragsarbeiten aus Privatbesitz. Dazu zählen auch jene Werke, die in der Ausstellung zu sehen sind. Es handelt sich um mehrere Landschaften und Porträtbilder, die vor einiger Zeit im Berliner Straßentrödelhandel aufgetaucht sind. Sie stammen ursprünglich aus dem Besitz einer gewissen Anna Staudinger aus Berlin-Adlershof. Ebenfalls ausgestellt sind die dazugehörigen, von Nüsslein als „Legenden“ bezeichneten Bildbeschreibungen in automatischer Text-Manier, die mit Schreibmaschine auf dem vorgedrucktem Briefpapier des selbsternannten „Malers und Schriftstellers des Übersinnlichen“ abgefasst sind. Nüsslein fertigte die Mehrzahl der Bilder und Texte sehr wahrscheinlich nicht im direkten Beisein der „Kontaktperson“ Anna Staudinger an, sondern auf der Grundlage von Schriftproben und Fotos von ihr. Mindestens zwei Mal scheint es jedoch zu persönlichen Begegnungen inklusive Bild- und Textanfertigungen gekommen sein, und zwar im September 1938 sowie im November 1939, jeweils in Berlin. Den fertigen Arbeiten legte er die ebenfalls ausgestellte Autogrammkarte mit der Schwarzweißaufnahme eines zweifellos bei einem akademisch geschulten Kollegen in Auftrag gegebenen Porträtgemäldes bei, das ganz im Stile der Neuen Sachlichkeit gehalten war, nur mit einer in diesem Kontext doch sehr ungewöhnlichen Geisterhand oben rechts im Bild, die gleichsam aus dem Dunkel kommend über Nüssleins Schulter schwebt.

Insgesamt fertigte Nüsslein je sieben Landschaften und Porträts für seine Berliner Auftraggeberin an. Zunächst entstand beim ersten persönlichen Zusammentreffen Ende September 1938 ein einzelnes Porträt, bei dem Nüsslein das Wort „Segen“ unten rechts in die Farbe ritzte und in der Legende erläuternd darauf hinwies, das dargestellte Konterfei sei ein „Bilde des Friedens“, das seine Adressatin erfreuen und behüten möge. Ob das Bild Anna Staudinger selbst in einem früheren Leben oder eine andere konkrete Person zeigen soll, geht aus dem Text nicht hervor. Sicher ist jedoch, dass Anna Staudinger derart angetan war, dass sie nur ein Jahr später eine ganze Bilderserie in Auftrag gab, und zwar eine sogenannte Karmaschau, welche die Auftraggeberin anhand von sechs Porträts und sechs zugehörigen Landschaftsbildern in gleich sechs früheren Inkarnationen nebst ihren entsprechenden Wirkungsstätten zeigen sollte. Nähere Erklärungen lieferten auch hier entsprechende Bildlegenden in gewohnt pathetisch-kryptischem Sprachjargon.

Leider sind von den ursprünglich insgesamt zwölf Bildern nur neun, fünf Porträts und vier Landschaften, erhalten. Diese sind in der Ausstellung so präsentiert, dass Leerstellen in der Hängung die Lückenhaftigkeit der Überlieferung nachvollziehbar machen. Aus den ebenfalls im Original ausgestellten Bildbeschreibungen geht in genauer Abfolge von 1 bis 12 hervor, was wir auf den Bildern sehen bzw. in den Fällen, in denen diese nicht mehr vorhanden sind, eben nicht mehr sehen, z.B. eine frühere Inkarnation von Anna Staudinger als Priesterin eines Sonnenkults im alten Mexiko, als Sportlehrerin im „Reiche der Lemuren“, als Friedensstifterin in Zeiten der Cherusker, als Baumeister männlichen Geschlechts im fünften Jahrtausend v. Chr. sowie als Tempeldienerin auf dem Planeten Mars. Über die Zuordnung von Bild und Text konnte auch die Identifikation der Fehlstellen des Nüsslein Konvoluts aus dem ehemaligen Besitz von Anna Staudinger geleistet werden.

Wie Heinrich Nüsslein selbst in einer seiner Schriften ausführt, hat er in den Dreißiger Jahren des Öfteren solch zwölfteilige Karmaschauen erstellt, die ihm zufolge „in ihrer Reihenfolge ganz eigenartige Aufklärungen“ zu den Reinkarnationen einer Person gaben. Bislang war jedoch von erhaltenen Serien dieser Art nichts bekannt. Die Karmaschau von Anna Staudinger stellt somit, wie es scheint, trotz ihres fragmentarischen Erhaltungszustands, eine absolute Rarität dar. Möglicherweise ist sie sogar die einzige in großen Teilen erhaltene Karmaschau von Heinrich Nüsslein überhaupt.

Eine weitere Landschaft, die Nüsslein nur wenige Wochen später, im November 1939, bei einem erneuten Berlin-Aufenthalt möglicherweise in Ergänzung zu seinem ersten für Anna Staudinger gemalten Porträtbild erstellte, ist leider ebenfalls nicht erhalten. Lediglich die Bildlegende, die von einem „Tempel aus dem Maja-Kult in den heiligen Gärten“ spricht und die hier allein, auf sich gestellt, und ohne malerische Visualisierung zu sehen ist, ist noch vorhanden.

Sämtliche Bilder aus dem ehemaligen Besitz von Anna Staudinger weisen auf Nüssleins kunsthistorische Vorbilder hin: vom Symbolismus über Expressionismus bei den Porträts bis hin zu ostasiatischer Seiden- und Fingermalerei sowie zum Jugendstil bei den Landschaften. So sehr Nüsslein jedoch durch ihm bekannte Kunstwerke und Stilrichtungen inspiriert war, so sehr war er doch auf einen eigenen, innovativen Ansatz bedacht, was sowohl an seinem selbstreferentiellem Umgang mit dem Material als auch am Einsatz unkonventioneller Techniken deutlich wird. Heinrich Nüsslein betrieb einen ritualisierten, von Wiederholung von Stilmitteln und Motiven geprägten und gleichzeitig gestischen Malvorgang, in dem die Farbe ganz im Sinne der modernen Abstraktion eine Qualität an sich darstellt. Insofern ist Heinrich Nüsslein, der zwar in einigen insbesondere auf die Kunst von Außenseitern spezialisierten Sammlungen vertreten ist und auch von späteren Künstlern wie beispielsweise Arnulf Rainer nachdrücklich rezipiert wurde, nicht nur ein herausragender Protagonist der medialen Kunst, sondern auch ein durchaus bemerkenswerter Maler der Moderne, der heute zu Unrecht weitgehend vergessen ist.

Die ausgestellten Arbeiten der verschiedenen zeitgenössischen Künstler liefern durchweg einen repräsentativen Ausschnitt aus ihrem jeweiligen Werk und wurden in ihrer überwiegenden Mehrzahl auch nicht eigens für die Ausstellung hergestellt. Sie sind ebenso kleinformatig wie die gezeigten Bilder von Heinrich Nüsslein, umfassen jedoch neben der Malerei auch die Medien Fotografie, Zeichnung und Collage.

So zeigt etwa der in Berlin lebende Georgier Gotscha Gozalishvili eine vielfarbige Vermalung aus dem Jahr 2005, die im Landschaftsformat gehalten ist, doch ganz entfernt auch an ein Porträt denken lässt, während Thomas Helbig in einer aktuellen Papierarbeit, die Frottage- und Zeichentechniken ebenso kombiniert wie figürliche und abstrakte Momente, das Bildnis einer offenbar vielgestaltigen, multiplen Persönlichkeit aufscheinen lässt. Das Gemälde Dark Times, 2013 von Andy Hope 1930 liefert dagegen ein mit Collageanteilen versehenes Porträtgemälde, das einem dystopisch-surrealen Sci-Fi-Comic entstammen könnte. Die Fotocollage von Erwin Kneihsl, Ohne Titel (Kreuze I), 2009 inszeniert das dramatische Setting an einem berühmten litauischen Wallfahrtsort in körnigen Schwarzweiß-Kontrasten als endzeitliches Landschaftsbild. Markus Selg wiederum entwirft in seiner am Computer erstellten Malerei Messina aus dem Jahr 2010 ein Terrain, das nicht weniger fantastisch erscheint, als die von Heinrich Nüsslein gestalteten Naturszenerien. Und Thomas Zipp evoziert in seinem Porträtgemälde A.F.: Magic Square Face von 2019 den Eindruck der völligen Auflösung des individuellen menschlichen Antlitz’ zugunsten eines (pseudo-)wissenschaftlichen Prinzips.